OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (2022)

By Oxbow

Rated 4.2135 out of 5 stars

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(Video) Oxbow Western Timothy Hay

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About This Item

  • Convenient and enriching blend of Western Timothy and Orchard Grass.
  • Provides the perfect combination of tastes and textures for your rabbit, guinea pig or chinchilla.
  • Supplies essential fiber to support digestive and dental health to your furry friend.
  • Hand-sorted and hand-blended with care from ingredients harvested from Oxbow’s family farm.
  • Doesn’t include any artificial colors, flavors or preservatives—just wholesome ingredients you can trust.

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Oxbow Orchard Grass Hay Small Animal Food, 40-oz bag

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Customer Rating

Rated 4.2135 out of 5 stars

281

Rated 3.5945 out of 5 stars

1,048

Rated 4.3687 out of 5 stars

396

Rated 3 out of 5 stars

6

Rated 4.5625 out of 5 stars

32

Price

$11.49Chewy Price

$10.62Chewy Price

$10.62Chewy Price

$15.99Chewy Price

$12.10Chewy Price

Autoship

$10.92Chewy Price

$10.09Chewy Price

$10.09Chewy Price

$15.19Chewy Price

$11.49Chewy Price

Top IngredientsTimothy Grass, Orchard Grass.100% Timothy Hay. Preservative and Additive Free. Loose Hay Contains Stems, Leaves, and Limited Seed Heads....100% Orchard Grass Preservative and Additive Free. Loose Hay Contains Stems, Leaves, and Limited Seed Heads....Timothy Hay.Timothy Grass Hay, Dried Carrots.
Small Pet TypeRabbit, Guinea Pig, Chinchilla, DeguRabbit, Guinea Pig, Chinchilla, DeguRabbit, Guinea Pig, Chinchilla, DeguDegu, Chinchilla, Guinea Pig, RabbitRabbit, Guinea Pig, Chinchilla, Degu
Health FeatureDental & Breath Care, Digestive HealthDental & Breath Care, Digestive HealthDental & Breath Care, Digestive HealthDental & Breath Care, Digestive HealthDental & Breath Care, Digestive Health
Special DietHigh FiberLow-Protein, High FiberLow-Protein, High FiberHigh FiberHigh Fiber
Hay TypeTimothy, Orchard GrassTimothyOrchard GrassTimothyTimothy
Food FormHayHayHayHayHay, Dried Veggies
(Video) Hay - What to choose - Variety - Alfalfa - Orchard - Timothy

Questions & Answers

9 Customer Questions

Do you recommend keeping the bag open to keep the hay dry?

Answer by

Jun 21, 2019

Hay should be stored in a cool, dry place with good air circulation (don't close it tightly in a plastic bag - a brown paper bag or pillow case works well).

Is this 1st, 2nd or 3rd cutting?

Answer by

Sep 11, 2019

Oxbow will harvest the hay prior to it reaching its maturity stage so it's neither 1st or 2nd Cut.

how long with a 90 ounce bag last a 4lb dwarf rabbit. my holland lop maybe eats close to 24oz a month if that and I wanna make sure I stock up so I'll only have to do auto ship every 5 months.

Answer by

Oct 30, 2018

The longevity of the bag depends on your rabbit's daily eating habits. As most rabbit owners allow their rabbits to have unlimited access to hay the longevity of the bag can vary.

Is a 90 oz a lot? How big is it?

Answer by

Aug 20, 2019

A 20 ounce bag contains approximately 1.3 pounds, a 40 ounce bag contains approximately 2.5 pounds, and a 90 ounce bag contains approximately 6 pounds.

ReviewsWrite a Review

4.2

Rated 4.2135 out of 5 stars

281 Reviews

88%

Would recommend to a friend

1

9.9644

(Video) Oxbow Hay Any Way

10%

2

6.0498

6%

3

6.4057

6%

4

7.8292

8%

5

69.7509

70%

281 Customer Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

By CharliesMom on Aug 28, 2022

Try It, You'll Like It!

Bunnies can be finicky eaters just like all other pets and humans. Oxbow seems to please most often. Decided to try the mixture of Timothy and Orchard Hay and Charlie likes it! A LOT! He recommends it!

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

By motherofbubbies on May 17, 2022

Used to be the best—now horrible quality

This was my go-to hay for my three Holland lops; it was always fresh, green and sweet-smelling. Although it’s cheaper to buy in bulk, I’ve had three bags of this hay as an autoship order for a while now as it’s the only hay my rabbits will eat without wasting too much. Just received my latest shipment today and was really surprised by the poor quality when I opened the first bag! Hay looked dull and smelled a little musty. I thought it was just a fluke so I opened up the remaining two bags only to find the same thing. Extremely disappointed as I now have to go to the local pet store to get new hay since my rabbits won’t touch this stuff.

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

By Disappointed on Aug 5, 2022

Hay Not Fresh

Very upset with this bag of hay. The last batch was much greener and fresh. This one looks horrible, dry, and really old. Will not be buying this product from Chewy again.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

By Brenda on Jul 13, 2022

Bunny loves it

My 2 year old mixed breed bunny that I adopted, didn"t seem to like just Timothy hay. So I tried this blend with Orchard grass and she loves it. She definately eats more of this. I will be ordering more of this.

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

By Megan on Mar 20, 2022

Oxbow has gone downhill

I've always bought Oxbow products because of the superior quality of hay, but the last few times I've bought it, it's been pretty disappointing. This most recent batch was the worst. There were giant clumps of hay stuck together that was very brittle and lots of brown. I probably will not be buying Oxbow hay anymore.

  • OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (23)
  • OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (24)
  • OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (25)
  • OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (26)
  • OXBOW Animal Health Oxbow Hay Blends Western Timothy & Orchard, 40-oz. - Chewy.com (27)

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

By BunnyMom1 on Apr 6, 2022

Was great, now sucks

We've been buying this blend for at least a year now and have always been pleased. Oxbow recently changed both the packaging and the formulation - this is the second bag we've gotten like this. First, it is so full of massive, hard straw-like pieces, it's not a good blend anymore - our rabbit picks through it and avoids the huge hard pieces, so it's a waste. Second, they pack the bag so tight it's almost impossible to get hay out of the bag, and when you do it goes flying everywhere. Massive fail - not sure what the cause is but I won't be getting it again.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars

By sfkj on Apr 24, 2022

this is nice hay

I've been having troubles with the hay I usually ordered for my piggies, so I tried this one. The hay looks good, very few brown pieces. Pigs like it, but not as much as they like all timothy hay.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars

By Hannah on May 11, 2022

Consistent quality hay

My guinea pig always enjoys this blend of hay! I like to get the blend because sometimes the bag of timothy hay only seems less enticing to him

Rated 2 out of 5 stars

By Nicole on Mar 10, 2022

Packaging is the worse

These bags are packed so tightly that it's hard to get hay out and it ends up everywhere. Hay slivers are just as bad as wood. Which is what you get when trying to pull handfuls out of the bag. My guinea pigs prefer the Kaytee brand over this. The girls will eat it the boys refuse to.

Rated 1 out of 5 stars

By FurAngelsRescue on Mar 21, 2022

Horrible Bag of hay

We had to throw away most of the bag of hay due to being all dried out. There was huge, hard pieces. One of the piggies poked it’s eye on the hay trying to eat it. None of the furry caged pets (rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas) would eat it. We have bought hay from Oxbow before that was good quality, so not sure if this was a combination of poor storage by Chewy or a fluke bad bag from Oxbow. Regardless, we were very unhappy with it.

FAQs

Is Oxbow Western Timothy Hay good for rabbits? ›

Oxbow's all-natural Western Timothy Hay is a nutritious, sweet-smelling grass that will stimulate the appetite of your rabbit, guinea pig, chinchilla, or other small pet. Western Timothy is the #1 vet-recommended hay for small herbivores.

What's the difference between timothy hay and Western Timothy Hay? ›

Note: Timothy Hay is more suitable for adult rabbits due to the low calcium content. Oxbow Western Timothy Hay is high in fibre, low in protein and calcium and is a good, basic grass hay with high quality nutrition.

Is Oxbow hay the best? ›

#1 Overall Best Hay: Oxbow Animal Health Western Timothy Hay

Oxbow is the brand most recommended by – and used by – veterinarians. This nutritious, sweet-smelling hay is grown specifically for small pets in the U.S.A. by the company's family of farms. It's high in fiber to aid your pet's dental and digestive health.

Is Oxbow hay second cut? ›

Oxbow uses both first and second cutting hay. First cutting hay typically has more stems with larger seed heads. The second cutting is more likely to be leafier and softer with more brown leaves and smaller seed heads.

What is the best hay to feed rabbits? ›

Timothy hay

Timothy has is the most popular type of hay fed to rabbits and other small pets. It provides the proper nutritional content and nutrients that rabbits need and has high fiber content. There are different cuts of timothy hay that affect the nutrition, but in general timothy hay is a good choice.

How much grass does a rabbit eat per day? ›

A healthy rabbit's diet should consist of unlimited amounts timothy and other grass hays, 1-3 cups of fresh leafy greens daily, and only about 1/8-1/4 cup of quality timothy pellets for rabbits up to 5 lbs and up to 3/4 cup for rabbits up to 10 lbs. Fruits and sugary vegetables (i.e. carrots) should only be offered as ...

What hay is not good for horses? ›

Bahiagrass: This grass hails from the southern coastal plains. It's typically found in pastures, so the stuff they make into hay is not that great for horses. Overly mature Bahiagrass hay can cause ergot poisoning, so buyer beware.

What is the healthiest hay for horses? ›

Legume Hay for Horses

Alfalfa, white clover, red clover and birdsfoot trefoil are common types of legumes, with alfalfa being the most popular choice. Benefits: Legumes are higher in protein and calcium than grass hay, and may also provide more energy and a higher level of total digestible nutrients, such as vitamin A.

What should I not feed my rabbit? ›

Cookies, nuts, seeds, grains, and bread should not be fed to rabbits. "Cookies, nuts, seeds, grains, and bread should not be fed to rabbits." Fruits can be fed in very limited quantities – no more than 1-2 tablespoons of high-fiber fresh fruit (such as apple, pear, or berries) every 1-2 days.

Are there mites in timothy hay? ›

Close inspection of the leaves revealed that they were heavily infested with mites. Cereal rust mites, Abacarus hystrix (Nalepa), are reported as troublesome in timothy in the northeastern states.

What is the difference between timothy hay and orchard grass? ›

Timothy is very low-yielding when cut at a young age, so it is rare to see pure timothy hay that is without seed heads. On the other hand, orchardgrass can be cut before the seed heads emerge with a fairly high yield, producing a leafy, non-stemmy hay.

How long can guinea pigs go without hay? ›

Your guinea pig needs a fresh supply of grass hay daily. They can go for up to 24 hours without hay, but between 24-48 hours, they will likely die.

What is better 1st cut or 2nd cut timothy hay? ›

Hay is often cut three or more times each season. The first cutting in any cut will have thicker stems, perhaps have flowers (usually called tassel), and is the highest in fiber of any cut. The second cutting is softer, greener, has a higher protein but lower fiber than first cutting.

Should rabbits eat first or second cut hay? ›

Premium 2nd cut Timothy hay is preferred by most grass eating small animals (Bunnies, Rabbits, Chinchillas, Gerbils, Hamsters, Mice, Rats, and Tortoises). 2nd cutting is called “second” because it is the hay that is harvested after the 1st cutting.

Does hay go bad? ›

Hay is a natural product that doesn't expire in the traditional sense of the term. When stored in the proper conditions, hay will retain its nutritional value for many months. Hay is required to feature a “freshest by” date that you will typically find on the back side of your hay packaging.

What is the sweetest hay? ›

Alfalfa is the sweetest and softest hay variety. Because of its richness and high calcium content, you shouldn't feed Alfalfa to your adult rabbits as it can cause obesity and kidney or bladder stones.

How do I know if my rabbit is depressed? ›

Signs of depression in rabbits
  1. Lack of energy and curiosity (lethargy) ...
  2. Lack of appetite. ...
  3. Fur pulling. ...
  4. Not self-grooming. ...
  5. Persistent destructive behaviors. ...
  6. Unexplained aggressive behavior. ...
  7. Pacing. ...
  8. Avoids social interactions.

What vegetables can rabbits not eat? ›

Poisonous vegetables for rabbits include potatoes, rhubarb, mushrooms, broad beans, kidney beans and iceberg lettuce, Dacombe says. On the fruit side, avocado is a fatty fruit that contains a fungicidal toxin called persin that can be deadly if ingested by a pet rabbit.

Can rabbits go a day without hay? ›

Rabbits can only live without hay if they can eat a lot of grass instead. Hay and/or grass are an essential part of the rabbit's diet, and there are no alternatives to them.

Can rabbits eat too much hay? ›

There's no such thing as a rabbit eating too much hay. Rabbits' teeth grow constantly. Grazing on hay helps to keep their teeth short. If your rabbit isn't eating enough hay, it'll have to have its teeth filed down by a veterinarian.

Should horses have hay all time? ›

Conclusion. Horses don't have to eat all the time, but having constant access to hay helps keep their digestive system working correctly. Allowing your horse to graze on pasture grass is safe and keeps them healthy. A healthy pasture provides all the nutrition horses need.

Can hay be too green for horses? ›

Even if the outside of the bale is faded to yellow or beige, the internal hay can be perfectly safe to feed your horse as long as it's still green. If the internal hay is bleached out, brown, black, or yellow inside the bales, the hay has most likely lost its nutritional value and may be moldy or rotted.

Which grass hay is not recommended for horses? ›

Alfalfa hay

This legume hay is higher in protein than grass hay. However, it has high calcium to phosphorus ratio, which isn't suitable for growing horses.

What time of day does grass have the most sugar? ›

Sugar content of grasses is higher in the afternoon than in the morning and sugar content is lowest at night, so grazing should be restricted to the safest times of the day to graze, early morning and night times.

How many flakes of hay should I feed my horse per day? ›

horse five flakes every day. Remember to feed in as many small portions as possible.

Can horses eat too much grass? ›

After a season of sparse Winter pasture, the sweet green grass brought on by Spring rain can be very tempting to your horse. However, eating too much too quickly can lead to serious abdominal pain, known as grass colic. A type of spasmodic colic, grass colic is caused by gas build-up in the digestive tract.

What should you not do with rabbits? ›

Check out our list of 15 foods that you should never feed your rabbit:
  • Yogurt Drops. ...
  • Bread, Pasta, Cookies, and Crackers. ...
  • Avocado. ...
  • Cereal. ...
  • Iceberg Lettuce. ...
  • Silverbeet. ...
  • Hamster Food. ...
  • Walnuts.
17 Mar 2017

What is the most common cause of death in rabbits? ›

The researchers found that the most common causes of death recorded by veterinary surgeons were flystrike (10.9% of pet rabbits), anorexia (4.9%), collapse (4.9%) and gut stasis (4.3%). The average lifespan of pet rabbits was 4.3 years, although survival up to 14.4 years had been recorded.

What lettuce is bad for rabbits? ›

Myth #3 - Rabbits eat lettuce

Rabbits shouldn't eat some lettuces (such as iceberg), as they contain lactucarium, which can be harmful in large quantities. Some lettuce is 'worse' than others - light-coloured varieties are high in water and have very little nutritional value, so are not recommended.

What kind of bugs live in hay bales? ›

An unwanted guest you may be bringing into your yard with the hay bales are straw itch mites (Pyemotes tritici). These mites are associated with stored commodities, including hay, and have been commonly found in wheat straw hay.

Can you get mites from hay? ›

Straw itch mites can be a problem when dried foodstuffs (fruits, seeds, cereal products and pet food) and especially baled hay, are infested with the larvae of storage insects and placed in warm, humid environments.

What kind of bugs live in straw? ›

Hay or straw itch mites, Pyemotes tritici, in the family Pyemotidae, are tiny (about 0.2 mm long) creatures. They are common parasites of insects infesting dried plant material, particularly grain, dried beans and peas, straw, hay and other dried grasses.

Can rabbits eat Orchard hay everyday? ›

Yes, Orchard grass hay is good for rabbits since it contains 32% fiber and is low in protein at 7% which is excellent for your rabbit's health. Orchard grass hay should make up 80% of your rabbits' total diet and is safe to feed in unlimited quantities.

Is timothy hay high in sugar? ›

Timothy hay is considered a medium sugar hay. This warm-season grass measures at the low end of the normal range for ethanol soluble carbohydrates, measuring between 4.7 percent and 10.9 percent.

What is the difference between timothy hay and regular hay? ›

Alfalfa hay is higher in protein and calories, but timothy hay has more fiber and better calcium to phosphorus ratio. If you feed your horse a mixture of these two types of hay, it will get the best combinations possible for optimum nutrition.

Do guinea pigs need hay everyday? ›

Timothy hay: Provide an unlimited quantity of fresh timothy hay every day. Guinea pigs need continuous access to hay to aid their digestion and limit the growth of their teeth. Fruit and vegetables: Fresh vegetables can be offered once a day and should be equivalent to about one cup total per guinea pig per day.

Can guinea pigs survive on just hay? ›

1) Hay: (70-75%)

Hay is absolutely vital to the digestive health of your guinea pig. It prevents obesity, dental disease, diarrhea and boredom. Your guinea pig should have unlimited access to high quality grass hay. Your guinea pig should eat a pile of hay as big as his body every day.

What can I feed my guinea pig instead of hay? ›

On the whole, fresh grass is the best choice to temporarily replace hay. Guinea pigs can forage for this in the backyard, replicating natural behaviors, or grass can grown in trays inside. It is important to be selective about the type of grass you use for your guinea pig's diet, and to introduce it slowly.

What month do you cut hay? ›

Optimum conditions for first cuttings can generally be expected around May 15th in the south and May 25th in the north. Though different cuttings provide different levels of nutrition (a topic for a future blog), the most important determination of hay quality is its state of maturity when cut.

What cut of hay is the best? ›

The most common choice of hay is second cutting, but first cutting is also good for horses, plus it is usually cheaper than the other two. Choose hay that is soft, green, and leafy, with thin stems, so it is easier for horses to eat.

What is the difference between 1st 2nd and 3rd cut timothy hay? ›

To begin with, 1st cutting is the first hay cut from that field for the year. It tends to be more coarse and have more grasses in it. 2nd cutting is usually greener in color and has a sweeter smell. And lastly, 3rd cutting is very thick and rich.

Is 3rd cutting hay OK for horses? ›

Third (and later) cut alfalfa, develops a higher leaf to stem ratio because of the slower growth during the cool part of the season. Therefore, third cut hay will usually have the highest nutritive value. Horses which are not accustomed to a good, leafy hay may experience flatulent (gaseous) colic or a loose stool.

Which cut of hay is the softest? ›

Third cut is a very soft and heavy leafy hay. It should be a darker green than 1st and 2nd cut. It's higher in protein and fat content and lowest in fiber content.

Is first or second cut hay better for goats? ›

Second cutting is generally the preferred hay for goats. It has less weeds, is finer-stemmed, fertilized, and grown during the optimal growing season. In areas with longer growing seasons, a third cutting or even higher may be available. Late season cuttings have the highest leaf to stem ratio.

Does hay go bad after a year? ›

If the hay was of good-quality when harvested and stored in a dry place with sufficient airflow, hay is likely suitable for consumption for two to three years. Keep in mind that hay, even premium forage, loses much of its vitamin content in the first few months of storage.

How often should I change rabbits hay? ›

Hay bedding in a rabbit's living space should be changed once a week if the rabbit uses a litter box. If a rabbit doesn't use a little box, this hay will need to be changed once every 2-3 days. Additional hay should be added at least once daily as rabbits will likely consume this hay for food.

Can horses eat 2 year old hay? ›

Hay Storage

Hay will lose nutritional value the longer it is stored. However, hay can be fed the second year after it is cut as long as it is dry and free from mold. The lower the moisture content the longer it can be stored with less chance of mold and spoilage.

Is Timothy hay and Timothy grass the same thing? ›

Timothy Grass has a slightly higher protein and is greener in appearance. Timothy Hay is a mix of leaves and stems from Timothy grass, which is a perennial bunch grass. Timothy Hay is high in fiber and low in protein which is a combination critical to the health of rabbits and other small animals.

What is the difference between 1st cut and 2nd cut timothy hay? ›

The first cutting in any cut will have thicker stems, perhaps have flowers (usually called tassel), and is the highest in fiber of any cut. The second cutting is softer, greener, has a higher protein but lower fiber than first cutting. Flowers and stalks are usually not present, just leaves.

Is Western timothy hay good for guinea pigs? ›

Oxbow's all-natural Western Timothy Hay is a nutritious, sweet-smelling grass that will stimulate the appetite of your rabbit, guinea pig, chinchilla, or other small pet. Western Timothy is the #1 vet-recommended hay for small herbivores.

What is the best hay for guinea pigs to eat? ›

Your guinea pig should eat a pile of hay as big as his body every day. Avoid alfalfa hay unless directed by your veterinarian. Instead choose timothy, orchard grass or oat hay. Unless the hay in your pet's habitat is soiled, do not replace it as this could encourage picky eating!

Does Timothy grass come back every year? ›

It is a cool season perennial grass with rapid growth. The plant gets its name from Timothy Hanson, who promoted the grass in the 1700s as a pasture grass. The grass is native to Europe, temperate Asia and North Africa. The plant is adapted to numerous climates and performs well in even cold, northern regions.

Does hay grow back every year? ›

Planting and growing

Some fields are always used to grow hay, and don't require re-planting every year. In other cases, hay is a part of a crop rotation, where farmers plant different crops on the same field in different years.

What animals can eat timothy hay? ›

What Animals Eat Timothy Hay? Around the world, many types of livestock utilize Timothy as part of their feed regimen including horses, cattle, goats, camels, and sheep. Small animals also benefit from the high fiber levels of timothy hay.

Do rabbits prefer first or second cut hay? ›

Generally speaking, the 2nd cut of hay is usually the best choice for most adult rabbits. This is because it usually has the best balance of nutrients such as fiber, protein, calcium and fat, along with palatability.

Should rabbits eat first or second cut hay? ›

Premium 2nd cut Timothy hay is preferred by most grass eating small animals (Bunnies, Rabbits, Chinchillas, Gerbils, Hamsters, Mice, Rats, and Tortoises). 2nd cutting is called “second” because it is the hay that is harvested after the 1st cutting.

What's better first or second cut hay? ›

Timothy Hay

Timothy must be harvested in the pre- or early-bloom stage to ensure a high nutrient content. The first cutting usually has a higher weed content, and quality decreases after the second cutting, so the second cutting is usually the best to feed.

How long can guinea pigs go without hay? ›

Your guinea pig needs a fresh supply of grass hay daily. They can go for up to 24 hours without hay, but between 24-48 hours, they will likely die.

Is first cut or second cut hay better for guinea pigs? ›

Hay - 1st, 2nd, 3rd cutting - What to choose - Guinea pigs - YouTube

How often should you change guinea pig hay? ›

Timothy hay: Provide an unlimited quantity of fresh timothy hay every day. Guinea pigs need continuous access to hay to aid their digestion and limit the growth of their teeth. Fruit and vegetables: Fresh vegetables can be offered once a day and should be equivalent to about one cup total per guinea pig per day.

What hay do guinea pigs like the most? ›

Timothy hay and Orchard hay are two of the most popular types given to adult guinea pigs for they boast high fiber content and is truly suitable for guinea pigs .

Can guinea pigs eat too much hay? ›

The short answer is that you really can't put too much hay in a rabbit or guinea pig's habitat. The more hay they have available, the greater their opportunity to constantly forage and graze, which is extremely important not just for their physical health, but for their mental stimulation as well.

Videos

1. The 7 Best Hays for Rabbits (We Tested Them All)
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